9780743567619
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A Thousand Splendid Suns audiobook

  • By: Khaled Hosseini
  • Narrator: Atossa Leoni
  • Length: 11 hours 44 minutes
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Publish date: March 21, 2023
  • Language: English
  • (1271869 ratings)
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A Thousand Splendid Suns Audiobook Summary

After more than two years on the bestseller lists, Khaled Hosseini returns with a beautiful, riveting, and haunting novel of enormous contemporary relevance.

A Thousand Splendid Suns is a breathtaking story set against the volatile events of Afghanistan’s last thirty years‚Äîfrom the Soviet invasion to the reign of the Taliban to post-Taliban rebuilding‚Äîthat puts the violence, fear, hope and faith of this country in intimate, human terms. It is a tale of two generations of characters brought jarringly together by the tragic sweep of war, where personal lives‚Äîthe struggle to survive, raise a family, find happiness‚Äîare inextricable from the history playing out around them.

Propelled by the same storytelling instinct that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once a remarkable chronicle of three decades of Afghan history and a deeply moving account of family and friendship. It is a striking, heartwrenching novel of an unforgiving time, an unlikely friendship, and an indestructible love—a stunning accomplishment.

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A Thousand Splendid Suns Audiobook Narrator

Atossa Leoni is the narrator of A Thousand Splendid Suns audiobook that was written by Khaled Hosseini

About the Author(s) of A Thousand Splendid Suns

Khaled Hosseini is the author of A Thousand Splendid Suns

A Thousand Splendid Suns Full Details

NarratorAtossa Leoni
Length11 hours 44 minutes
AuthorKhaled Hosseini
PublisherSimon & Schuster Audio
Release dateMarch 21, 2023
ISBN9780743567619

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Subjects

The publisher of the A Thousand Splendid Suns is Simon & Schuster Audio. A Thousand Splendid Suns includes the following subjects: The BISAC Subject Code is Fiction, Historical

Additional info

The publisher of the A Thousand Splendid Suns is Simon & Schuster Audio. The imprint is Simon & Schuster Audio. It is supplied by Simon & Schuster Audio. The ISBN-13 is 9780743567619.

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Goodreads Reviews

Tharindu

August 16, 2021

"A face of grievances unspoken, burdens gone unprotested, a destiny submitted to and endured." This must have been the longest time I had waited to review a fiction after finishing the book. Even after a week, I still haven't fully recuperated from the emotional blow of A Thousand Splendid Suns... Painful, heartbreaking, but quite beautiful in a very sad way. Hosseini has improved upon what he did with Kite Runner, if that's even possible, in every conceivable way imaginable to give the reader another masterpiece! I loved every little thing about this book. "Learn this now and learn it well, my daughter: Like a compass needle that points north, a man's accusing finger always finds a woman." When I finished Kite Runner before, it became clear how impactful Hosseini's story telling is: It was tragic yet beautiful in a unique way. I had thought I was prepared to pretty much anything the author could throw at me after that. But A Thousand Splendid Suns, for me, was a far more difficult read. Unlike in Kite Runner, Hosseini does not hold back when it comes to unfolding Mariam and Laila's story. Saying that reading through the abuse and other privations of the two protagonists was shocking would be a huge understatement. Everything felt too real to be consoled otherwise. In the Afterwards section, I did come across about Hosseini's work in UNHCR, and maybe it's his firsthand experience that made the portrayal this authentic. "It's our lot in life, Mariam. Women like us. We endure. It's all we have." The author continues to use his simple, and straightforward writing style which suits perfectly to the atmosphere he creates in these stories. But, even if one finds the writing style to be lacking in flavor, when the story telling is this good, most would never be bothered by anything else. And when you add Hosseini's flawless character development, it's impossible not to fall in love with this book. But where I saw the most significant improvement is in the plot, which stole the spotlight away from character department. The life story of the two protagonists -Mariam and Laila- allows the reader to peak in to a couple of lives heavily affected not only by war, but their journey amidst various domestic difficulties, providing the reader with another unique opportunity to empathize with Afghan people, and specifically from a woman's point of view this time. Instead of coming across hateful stories about Taliban and terrorism in general, it's enlightening to see the events from a perspective like this, which enables any reader to understand the bitter reality, along with the fact that countless thousands of people are experiencing worse circumstances in such countries. Even though it is fiction, I think it's commendable, and remarkable, what Hosseini does with these stories, as they help shift any reader's opinion about the people who are affected by wars in such countries. "People, she believed now, shouldn't be allowed to have new children if they'd already given away all their love to their old ones. It wasn't fair." Everything else that was good about Kite Runner is still here, from pace, flow of events, and handling of emotions to the ending. Oh, that ending! I rarely admire a sad ending, but Hosseini is definitely the exception. During the middle part of the book, even though I loved everything, I didn't see myself giving a rating higher than 4-stars, but the concluding chapters broke me down and changed everything. Now I feel like there aren't enough starts to do justice. "As she closed her eyes, it was not regret any longer but a sensation of abundant peace that washed over her.""One last time, Mariam did as she was told." It's not every day that I get to shelf two consecutive books from the same author as all-time-favorites. Honestly, I was not expecting this to be better than the first, and thought there might even be some repetitiveness. This is anything but that! If you loved Kite Runner, it is most likely that you will have an even better reading experience with this ATSS. However, be warned that the emotional impact this delivers is far more profound, leaving one with tears for quite a while. Unlike with Kite Runner, the luxury of hiding the despicable actions of villains, which left many horrific events to readers' imagination, is gone. But at the end of the day, just like with Kite Runner, it's worth every second... it's worth the heartbreak... it's worth evert tear... Another must-read-for-all from Hosseini. "A young Mariam is sitting at the table making a doll by the glow of an oil lamp. She's humming something. Her face is smooth and youthful, her hair washed, combed back. She has all her teeth." "The little girl looks up. Puts down the doll. Smiles. Laila jo?"

Lucy

January 27, 2008

** spoiler alert ** For the last two months I have been putting off reading this book. For starters, I bought the book at an airport in Taiwan, which meant it didn't have a due date which meant it took a backseat to many books that I didn't have the luxury of reading whenever.Additionally, because I've heard so much about this book already, I almost didn't want to read it at all. I've heard that it's depressing, that it's not as good as The Kite Runner, and that it's basically a novel about the brutal treatment of women in Afghanistan.You know when you read a book or see a film that has had great reviews and you finish feeling disappointed because it didn't live up to the hype? My experience reading this book was the complete opposite. I loved it. I didn't feel the message of the book was one of brutality or depression, but of hope and the toughness of the human spirit.There are plenty of awful scenes to lend credence to its reputation. While the story's time frame spans thirty years, the main focus of the novel are two woman, a generation apart, whose lives cross as they become the wives of the same man, Rasheed. The elder, Mariam, was born to a servant woman out of wedlock and is raised in banishment, ignorance and eventual rejection during the years the Afghani government was controlled by the communists. She finds herself forced to marry a much older man after her mother commits suicide. Laila, fifteen years younger and raised by intellectual parents, enters the marriage under much different circumstances. Alone after a bomb destroys her home and kills her parents, and pregnant by her childhood love who has fled the country, she marries Rasheed in a desperate attempt to save her unborn child.The writing engrossed me. Much like the Kite Runner, Hosseini magically puts the reader in the city, neighborhood and house of his characters. Much to his credit, I found myself torn between wanting to yell at Laila to hush up, so that she'd avoid another beating, and kicking Rasheed myself, because he is a despicable brute.Mariam, one of the most tragic characters in literature, makes this book what it is; a story of love and strenghth. She, who didn't have an easy day in her life, allows herself to be touched by the love of Laila and her children. In return, she performs the ultimate act of love and saves a family.I appreciate Hosseini's portrayal of a part of the world that is under so much scrutiny lately. Afghanistan, and the city of Kabul where the story takes place, have a long history of wars and occupations which result in a great chasm between different ethnic tribes, Islam, economic classes and gender. Hosseini uses this novel to tell the story of Afghani women and the hardships that face them with each regime change.As a woman, I feel blessed to have been given confidence and opportunities. I truly cannot imagine what it would be like to live under the conditions the women in this book live under. I am grateful to be born to the family I was born to and in a country which allows me to live the kind of life I choose.Miram and Laila didn't have the opportunities or support that I have. And yet they survived. They endured and they reached out to others, despite their circumstances. In this, Hosseini redeems all of Afghanistan by showing these two women's humanity. He shows that in a place whose beauty was written about in a 17th century poem, where "One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs and the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls" is a city that can become illuminated once again.

Anu

December 03, 2013

August 2007I was riding in a cab in Bombay recently, and a bookseller on foot approached me at a traffic light with a stack of books. I did my best not to look at the boy, but I couldn't help it. He was waving several books in my face and something caught my eye. I thought my glance was discreet, but he saw me look.. and it was game over. The light turned green right then and the boy starts running with the cab yelling 'Memsahib! Memsahib!'. We're picking up speed.. I'm so scared he's going to get his foot runover so I grab whatever I could from my wallet and somehow get it into his hands. In return he tosses a random book at me through the window as he's getting further & further away from the cab. I look to see what I ended up with. It was A Thousand Splendid Suns, which I was planning on buying anyways. The cab driver asked me how much I ended up giving the boy. 'A hundred and fifty rupees,' I said, which is barely $4. The cab driver says in return, 'You paid a hundred rupees too much!'. Hardly, I thought to myself. That boy worked his butt off. The best part is because the book is bootlegged it's full of typos and random fonts. Love it. In case I ever discuss the book with you and my recollection of the story is completely different from what you read, you'll know why.January 2008Read the book on my way to Vietnam a few days ago. Loved it, although it was missing a few pages here and there :). Coincidentally, the friend I'm traveling with brought the same book on our trip so I had access to the missing pages. (And another coincidence - our Mekong Delta guide was carrying a copy of the Kite Runner. We were like some sort of Hosseini fanclub floating down the Mekong in our longboat...haha). I have a few thoughts on this book, I'll write them out in more detail soon. I'm heading back to Bombay in a few days...maybe I'll run into another bookseller on foot :).

Emily

June 16, 2021

Apparently this will break my heart even more than The Kite Runner 🤞Update: It did.

Matthew

July 17, 2019

Amazing!Heart-Wrenching!Important!In a world where people tend to make assumptions about people and places based on the news, preconceived notions, prejudice, etc., this book needs to be read. I think a good portion of the American population hears “Afghanistan” and they think it is a country full or terrorists and unreasonable Muslim extremists who all band together to plot the downfall of anyone not like them. A Thousand Splendid Suns shows the progression of life in Afghanistan from the Soviet takeover in 1980s through post 9/11 Taliban control. All of this is through the eyes of two women trying to live a normal and peaceful life just like anyone in the world wants. You will see that despite the extremists and unreasonable values of some, most of the Afghani people are no different than you and me.Hosseini is a fantastic writer. Not only is the story enthralling, but the way he writes is engaging and easy to follow. I was never bored or confused. When I was not reading the book, I was thinking about the book and could not wait to get back to it and find out what happens. Sometimes you find the perfect book where the writing just falls into place with a click – that happened with this one. While the story takes place far away and the life discussed unusual for me, he made it very approachable and understandable.The characters were great. The ones I was rooting for I was REALLY rooting for. The ones that I despised I REALLY hated. When I get this invested in the characters, it is a sure sign of a great book!I will end with this warning: while a great and interesting book, it is, at times, difficult to read. There are situations and scenarios that are upsetting and may trigger lots of emotion. If you are extremely sensitive, it may be difficult to make it through. But, if you can, I think it will be worth it in the end.If you have not read this book yet, I think you should give it a try. The experience is very likely to be eye-opening and maybe even life-changing.

Emily May

March 24, 2019

It was a warm, sunny day in Montenegro and I was about to set out on a boat trip. I felt certain that a combination of sightseeing and the people I was with would keep me from having much time to read, but I packed a book anyway just in case there was time for a chapter or two in between stops. A Thousand Splendid Suns happened to be that book. And at the end of the day, when I staggered off that boat, blinking at my sudden exposure to reality, it wasn't because I'd been mesmerised by the stunning architecture and history lessons, no, it was because Hosseini stomped all over my heart. I'm not even sure how I found enough hours in the day to take a boat trip around Montenegro and read this entire novel, but somehow I finished this in the few hours I had... simply because I had to.My initial reaction was a furious, teary promise to myself that I would have to give this book five stars - I think it's impossible for the mind to win a battle with the heart in that level of heat, especially when you're used to English weather. But afterwards, I managed to reclaim some of my sense and sanity, which is when I finally began to acknowledge this book's limitations. For one thing, I think it's extremely generous to place this book in the "literary fiction" category. I am certainly no book snob (give me a delicious page-turner over some pretentious waffle any day) but I find myself comparing A Thousand Splendid Suns to another book about a country and culture I was only vaguely familiar with - The Poisonwood Bible - a book which I also read on my trip. The latter is a far more complex, ambitious work that brings something which, to me, felt entirely fresh and original. Hosseini's story, on the other hand, is not groundbreaking and I recognise many of the scenes and characters from other books.What it is, however, is incredibly emotional, sad, uplifting, infuriating and memorable. It's lessons on the history of Afghanistan and the rise of the Taliban might be basic but they are nothing if not compelling. I came away feeling like I learned something. What I did learn was truly horrifying, it painted details into the very vague images I already had in my mind that I had gotten from various British newspapers. But I also really liked the affection for his birth country that shines through Hosseini's story; his faith in the ultimate goodness of these people who witnessed society and order crumbling around them.The ultimate tragedy of this story, for me, is how everything could have been very different for Mariam and Laila if people had just acted a little faster, stopped worrying about their pride a little earlier, and trusted a little more. I really liked the range of emotions both women experienced and they way the author showed this. I know some readers thought it was wrong for Mariam to be jealous of Laila at first, but I actually really liked the complexity. Rasheed may be a bastard but he was the only thing in the world that she had at that point, and on some level it made sense to me that she would want to claim him for herself.While I believe Mariam and Laila experienced complex emotions and were well-developed, Rasheed did not get the same treatment - a fact which I'm torn about. On the one hand, I think Rasheed would have been a better character if he'd been developed beyond him being the most villainous villain in all villaindom. On the other hand, I think Rasheed's evil personality offers an important distinction between him and Jalil (and the other men), one which is needed in a book that looks at the cruelties women suffer at the hands of men. The difference between Rasheed and Jalil is important. The latter is a man who acts badly because his behaviour is shaped by the society he lives in. Rasheed, on the other hand, is a mean and violent brute who completely abuses the power handed to him as a man in this society. These differences between Rasheed, Jalil and the other men (Tariq, Laila's dad, etc.) show there is not one type of man in this society, that wife-beating is not simply a part of the culture, that even in a patriarchal society you can choose what type of man you want to be.I admit this is far from a perfect book, but it is a good book. It's a book that seems to swallow you whole but spit you back out in pieces. And, just to mention, I keep intending to read The Kite Runner again because I think studying it at school ruined it for me, but so far, I much prefer A Thousand Splendid Suns.

Ahmad

July 31, 2021

A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled HosseiniA Thousand Splendid Suns is a 2007 novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini. It is his second, following his bestselling 2003 debut, The Kite Runner. Mariam is an illegitimate child, and suffers from both the stigma surrounding her birth along with the abuse she faces throughout her marriage. Laila, born a generation later, is comparatively privileged during her youth until their lives intersect and she is also forced to accept a marriage proposal from Rasheed, Mariam's husband.عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: یک: «هزار خورشید درخشان»؛ دو: «هزار آفتاب شکفت انگیز»؛ سه: «هزار خورشید تابان»؛ چهار: «هزاران خورشید تابان»؛ پنج: «هزاران خورشید درخشان»؛ شش: «هزاران خورشید فروزان»؛ هفت: «هزار خورشید باشکوه»؛ هشت: «هزار خورشید رخشان»؛ نویسنده خالد حسینی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش ماه فوریه سال 2007میلادی و بار دیگر در ماه اکتبر سال 2008میلادیعنوان: هزار خورشید درخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: بیتا کاظمی؛ تهران، باغ نو، 1386؛ در 461ص؛ شابک 9789647425384؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان افغانی امریکایی - سده 21معنوان: هزار خورشید رخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم زامیاد سعدوندیان؛ تهران، نگارستان کتاب، 1387؛ در 488ص؛ شابک 9789648155297؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: پریسا سلیمانزاده اردبیلی؛ زیبا گنجی؛ تهران، مروارید، 1386؛ در 451ص؛ شابک 9789648831879؛ چاپ دوم و سوم 1387؛ پنجم 1388؛ ششم 1389؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: آزاده شهپری؛ تهران، ماهابه، 1393؛ در 428ص؛ شابک 9786005205503؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: حمیدرضا بلوچ؛ تهران، به سخن، 1394؛ در 407ص؛ شابک 9786009484492؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید باشکوه؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: ایرج مثال آذر؛ تهران، در دانش بهمن، 1386؛ در 464ص؛ شابک 9789641740070؛ چاپ دوم 1387؛عنوان: هزار خورشید باشکوه؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: ناهید سلامی؛ تهران، نشر چشمه، 1386؛ در 433ص؛ شابک 9789643623920؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید فروزان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: فیروزه مقدم (عابدی)؛ تهران، نشر تهران، 1389؛ در 487ص؛ شابک 9789642911158؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید درخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: سمیه گنجی؛ ساری، زهره، 1386؛ در 447ص؛ شابک 9789642981038؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: مژگان احمدی؛ تهران، بهزاد، 1389؛ در 320ص؛ شابک 9789642569939؛ عنوان: هزاران آفتاب شگفت انگیز؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: منیژه شیخ جوادی (بهزاد)؛ تهران، پیکان، 1386؛ در 432ص؛ شابک 9789643285623؛ نام و عنوان این کتاب از این بیت برگرفته شده: «حساب مه جبینان لب بامش که میداند؟ دوصد خورشیدرو افتاده بر، هر پای دیوارش»؛ بیت را روانشاد «صائب تبریزی اصفهانی» بزرگ‌ترین غزل سرای سده یازدهم هجری و نامدارترین شاعر زمان «صفویه» در وصف شهر «کابل» سروده اند؛نقل از متن کتاب: («جلیل» با خنده برایش داستان «ملکه گوهرشاد» را تعریف میکرد، که مناره های مشهور «هرات» را در سده پانزدهم میلادی، به عنوان چکامه ای از عشق خود به آن دیار بنا کرده بود، او برایش، از «گندمزارهای سبز هرات»، و «باغهای میوه»، «تاکستانهایی که آبستن شاخه های پربار انگور» بودند، «بازارهای پر ازدحام و شلوغ با سقفهای بلند و محرابی شان» گفته بود؛ یک روز «جلیل» گفت: «یک درخت پسته هست «مریم» جان، که زیر آن کسی جز «جامی»، شاعر بزرگ نخوابیده است»، پس از آن «جلیل» خم شد و زمزمه کرد «جامی پانصد سال پیش زندگی میکرد؛ بله؛ یکبار ترا به آنجا برده ام، پیش آن درخت، اما تو کوچک بودی و یادت نمیآید»)؛ پایان نقل از متنهشدار اگر هنوز کتاب را نخوانده اید و میخواهید بخوانید از خوانش ادامه ی ریویو لطفا خودداری فرمایید؛نویسنده روایتی دردناک از زندگی دو زن هموطن خویش ارائه میدهد، روایتی که به گفته ی خود ایشان تنها گوشه ای از دردهای بی پایان زنان افغان را، به تصویر میکشد، زنان توانا و پاکدامنی که در دام دنیایی خشن، نازیبا و ضد زن گرفتار شده اند، دنیایی که حتی فرصتی اندک برای لذت بردن از زندگی را از آنها دریغ میکند، دنیایی که در آن آنها مجالی برای ارائه ی توانایی هاشان نمییابند و دنیایی که در آن زن تنهاترین و البته مظلومترین موجود است؛ اما آیا محکوم بودن به زندگی در چنین دنیایی توانسته امید را از دلهای این زنان برباید؟ این پرسشی است که «مریم» و «لیلا» شخصیتهای اصلی رمان به آن پاسخ منفی میدهندهزار خورشید تابان روایت زندگی دو زن است، «مریم» دختر نامشروع یک بازرگان افغان، و «لیلا» دختر نازپرورده ی یک روشنفکر افغان، دو زنی که به رغم آغازهای متفاوت، سرنوشتی مشترک پیدا میکنند، و هر کدام غمخوار غم دیگری میشوند؛ پس از مرگ مادر، «مریم» برای مدتی کوتاه به خانه پدرش میرود، پدری که او را از خود نمیداند؛ در ادامه، پدر برای رها شدن از دست این مهمان ناخوانده، او را به عقد مردی مسن درمیآورد، مردی که «مریم» در خانه ی او، تلخترین رنجها را تجربه میکند؛ در گوشه ای دیگر از این سرزمین، موشکی شلیک میشود و «لیلا» را که دختر یک روشنفکر افغان است، همخانه ی «مریم» میکند، «مریمی» که اندک اندک در حال از دست دادن امیدش به زندگی استاما ورود «لیلا» به زندگی «مریم» او را صاحب دختری میکند، که آرزویش را داشته است، و «مریم» انگیزه ی نوی برای زندگی مییابد، انگیزه ی رهانیدن «لیلا»، از سرنوشتی که به نظر همان سرنوشت «مریم» است.؛ در سوی دیگر ماجرا، «لیلا» نیز که از آغوش پر مهر پدر و مادر خود محروم شده، به آغوش «مریمی» پناه میبرد که گویی به انتظارش نشسته بوده؛ از اینجا به بعد داستان به روایت مقاومتهای این دو زن در برابر خشونت «رشید» شوهرشان بدل میشود.؛ اما نقطه ی اوج داستان، صحنه کشته شدن «رشید» توسط «مریم» است، آنجا که «مریم» زندگی «رشید» را میگیرد و از زندگی خودش میگذرد، تا به لیلا و فرزندانش زندگی ببخشد.؛ «مریم» به زندان میافتد و سپس اعدام میشود، و «لیلا» به همراه عشق قدیمیش «طارق»، راه سرزمین همسایه، پاکستان را در پیش میگیرند، تا همراه با فرزندانش، جند روز آرامش را تجربه کندتاریخ بهنگام رسانی 01/06/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 09/05/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

Ahmad

August 11, 2021

A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled HosseiniA Thousand Splendid Suns is a 2007 novel by Afghan-American author Khaled Hosseini. It is his second, following his bestselling 2003 debut, The Kite Runner. Mariam is an illegitimate child, and suffers from both the stigma surrounding her birth along with the abuse she faces throughout her marriage. Laila, born a generation later, is comparatively privileged during her youth until their lives intersect and she is also forced to accept a marriage proposal from Rasheed, Mariam's husband. Hosseini has remarked that he regards the novel as a "mother-daughter story" in contrast to The Kite Runner, which he considers a "father-son story". It continues some of the themes used in his previous work, such as the familial aspects, but focuses primarily on female characters and their roles in Afghan society.عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «هزار خورشید درخشان»؛ «هزار آفتاب شگفت انگیز»؛ «هزار خورشید تابان»؛ «هزاران خورشید تابان»؛ «هزاران خورشید درخشان»؛ «هزاران خورشید فروزان»؛ «هزار خورشید باشکوه»؛ «هزار خورشید رخشان»؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه فوریه سال 2007میلادی و بار دیگر در ماه اکتبر سال 2008میلادیعنوان: هزار خورشید درخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: بیتا کاظمی؛ تهران، باغ نو، 1386؛ در 461ص؛ شابک 9789647425384؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان افغانی تبار امریکایی - سده 21معنوان: هزار خورشید رخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: زامیاد سعدوندیان؛ تهران، نگارستان کتاب، 1387؛ در 488ص؛ شابک 9789648155297؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: پریسا سلیمانزاده اردبیلی؛ زیبا گنجی؛ تهران، مروارید، 1386؛ در 451ص؛ شابک 9789648831879؛ چاپ دوم و سوم 1387؛ پنجم 1388؛ ششم 1389؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: آزاده شهپری؛ تهران، ماهابه، 1393؛ در 428ص؛ شابک 9786005205503؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: حمیدرضا بلوچ؛ تهران، به سخن، 1394؛ در 407ص؛ شابک 9786009484492؛ عنوان: هزار خورشید باشکوه؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: ایرج مثال آذر؛ تهران، در دانش بهمن، 1386؛ در 464ص؛ شابک 9789641740070؛ چاپ دوم 1387؛عنوان: هزار خورشید باشکوه؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: ناهید سلامی؛ تهران، نشر چشمه، 1386؛ در 433ص؛ شابک 9789643623920؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید فروزان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: فیروزه مقدم (عابدی)؛ تهران، نشر تهران، 1389؛ در 487ص؛ شابک 9789642911158؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید درخشان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: سمیه گنجی؛ ساری، زهره، 1386؛ در 447ص؛ شابک 9789642981038؛ عنوان: هزاران خورشید تابان؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: مژگان احمدی؛ تهران، بهزاد، 1389؛ در 320ص؛ شابک 9789642569939؛ عنوان: هزاران آفتاب شگفت انگیز؛ نویسنده: خالد حسینی؛ مترجم: منیژه شیخ جوادی (بهزاد)؛ تهران، پیکان، 1386؛ در 432ص؛ شابک 9789643285623؛ نام و عنوان کتاب از این شعر برگرفته شده: «حساب مه جبینان لب بامش که میداند؟ دوصد خورشیدرو افتاده بر، هر پای دیوارش»؛ بیت را «صائب تبریزی» در وصف «کابل» سروده استاز متن کتاب («جلیل» با خنده برایش داستان «ملکه گوهرشاد» را تعریف میکرد، که مناره های مشهور «هرات» را در قرن پانزدهم میلادی، به عنوان چکامه ای از عشق خود به آن دیار بنا کرده بود، او برایش از گندمزارهای سبز «هرات» و باغهای میوه، تاکستانهایی که آبستن شاخه های پربار انگور بودند، بازارهای پر ازدحام و شلوغ با سقفهای بلند و محرابیشان گفته بود؛ یک روز «جلیل» گفت: یک درخت پسته هست «مریم» جان، که زیر آن کسی جز «جامی»، شاعر بزرگ نخوابیده است، پس از آن «جلیل» خم شد و زمزمه کرد: «جامی» پانصد سال پیش زندگی میکرد؛ بله؛ یکبار ترا به آنجا برده ام، پیش آن درخت، اما تو کوچک بودی و یادت نمیآید)؛ پایان نقل از متنتاریخ بهنگام رسانی 08/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ 20/05/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

Dr. Appu

July 08, 2022

Khaled Hosseini tells us the story of millions of daughters, sisters, wives, and mothers through Miriam and Laila. We can see how the Taliban had shattered Afghanistan in this novel. The author has beautifully depicted hope, tragedy, and violence amid the war. The way he tells the history of a country through the eyes of two women is simply brilliant. This is a must-read book for everyone and can be considered one of the few books that can change the lives of people in the best possible way. “One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs,Or the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls.”

Henry

January 08, 2021

This novel is about two wonderful, brave , intelligent and resolute women Mariam and Laila their optimistic dreams, aspirations, boundless love... yet dehumanized in perilous, merciless, Afghanistan... continually suffering degradation during the tumultuous years in the long, sad history of that troubled, war ravished nation, Mariam born out of wedlock in Herat, to a wealthy man, lecherous Jalil and Nana, she was a maid at his house, he had already three wives and soon ten other children, sent to an isolated hovel by a tiny village , near the city to live out of sight, the embarrassment with her mother. The occasional visits by him were the highlight of Mariam's young life, a devoted daughter with an uncaring father, bitter Nana's endless recriminations against him, made for an appalling situation. At 15 the girl can no longer remain and flees to Jalil, who she loves above everyone nevertheless he refuses to see, taken back... an awful tragedy materializes .. Married off to a shoemaker in Kabul the capital, a big man almost thirty years older, Rasheed with a propensity to put women in their place, his wife must dress properly outside, walk behind, talk to him only when asked a virtual slave in the home, her main duty is to give him sons...but her numerous pregnancies do not go to fruition. The ignorant hypercritical husband, is always angry beatings and scoldings become common....Laila, background is very different than Mariam, from another generation, born and raised in Kabul, the bright student to loving parents, the father a former teacher, bookish, timid and small, dismissed by the communist government, an emotional domineering mother with bouts of ennui...depression, stays in bed many a day , her two sons joined the Mujahideen but were killed by the Soviet invaders. The war comes to the capital after the Russians leave, warlords struggle for power, starvation widespread, horrendous crimes committed in the open, shelling obliterated much of the city and the people, thousands perished ...including Laila's parents, in the future her teenage boyfriend Tariq two years older, escapes with his family to safety in Pakistan , she refused to leave her father and mother still alive then...Soon alone in trouble, Laila has to marry Rasheed...his wife Mariam , had nursed the wounded Laila in their home. It will be like before, the evil commences ... the aging Rasheed's punching, kicking, slapping, verbal abuse to both his wives , they are cognizant of their lowly status... only the son Zalmai is adored by him, his "daughter"Aziza, hated. ..An outstanding book about two remarkable women, who endure...they will fight back... someday.

She-who-must-not-be-named

May 07, 2021

" One could not count the moons that shimmer on her roofs,Or the thousand splendid suns that hide behind her walls." There are very few books that make me feel a tempest of emotions: make me happy and proud at one moment and break my heart in the next; make me chuckle at a few scenes and leave me in tears later, make me love a few characters and hate the others- and this is one such book.The novel focuses on the life of two Afghan women-Mariam and Laila who come from different walks of life. Laila enjoys her school life, and is absorbed by the thoughts of her crush Tariq. She's beautiful, confident, smart, strong and playful. Mariam, on the the other hand is the illegitimate daughter of a businessman Jalil . She faces a lot of social problems and rejection but she is headstrong and the real hero of the story. About Jalil well, I had a lot of mixed opinions: marrying Mariam off to Rasheed made me feel disgusted, but the (view spoiler)[ emotional letter he wrote at the last (hide spoiler)] took me by surprise.The characters in the book struggle for their survival in a harsh and obstinate society: They are wounded due to wars, relationships get tough and abusive, their property is destroyed; despite all this, they stick together, which is something I admired. But the best part about this book is the way Mariam and Laila show relentless pursuit and resilience and face all obstacles, especially considering how women are treated in their place- it filled me with pride and I was in love with their headstrongness. I was hooked, right from the first chapter. This book was pretty much like a rollercoaster- I felt a surge of emotions- anger, remorse and joy coursing through my veins with every passing chapter and I kept turning the pages to know more and before I had an inkling about it, I was done. The story was enticing, the narration was flawless, each chapter had a twist so intriguing I was compelled to read it multiple times.My heart beat fast reading about he struggles faced my Mariam and Laila and the ending just got so heartbreaking I was almost in tears. I have humongous respect for Khaled Hosseini and I'm looking forward to reading more of his books.

jessica

March 14, 2019

in true hosseini fashion, this book does not shy away from heavy, and sometimes uncomfortable, topics. but i realised that this book should make the reader feel uncomfortable. the tragedies that women face, even today, are crimes against humanity. but the strength of the two women this story follows is deeply moving and incredibly inspiring. to save my heart from emotional devastation, i tried to focus on the positives of this story, which can be summed up in this quote: ‘they would make new lives for themselves - peaceful, solitary lives - and there the weight of all that they had endured would lift from them, and they would be deserving of all the happiness and simple prosperity they would find.’ what a beautiful sentiment, that trials and suffering can help lead up to something more - more hope, more happiness. this story is a testament to the will-power and resilience of women, as well as a wonderful portrayal of friendship, family, and love. such a powerful book and a must-read for everyone. ↠ 4.5 stars

Luffy

August 11, 2020

I didn't know whether to keep on reading or DNF this book. I didn't know if I should give it 5 stars or 2. The thing is, I cannot abide extreme hardship, pain, and suffering on behalf of the characters that are in the books I read.I'm certain that this is to be the last book I'd read this year. And what a book did it prove to be! The mind reels at the barbarism that can be eked from such perverted ways of thinking. Reason, rationality are out of the window.I know I haven't mentioned the plot or who appears in the book, but I cannot. I cannot summarize this book. I need to read one of my favorite non fiction writers posthaste. I must forget the rawness of A Thousand Splendid Suns. The latter reads like a horrible documentary. I must dull the sadness in me. Sorry people, it's the best that I can do.

F

October 05, 2020

Loved this!

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