Try for free
Home Audiobooks Dead End in Norvelt

Speechify, the World's Audiobook App

Stars.svg
20M+ downloads | 150K+ 5-stars reviews
Scan now to listen it on your phone!

Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook

Publisher List Price: 19.99 USD

Speechify Price: Coming soon

Written by Jack Gantos

Narrated by Jack Gantos

Published on September 13, 2011

Audio is 1193 hours and 20 minutes

About Dead End in Norvelt:

Dead End in Norvelt is the winner of the 2012 Newbery Medal for the year’s best contribution to children’s literature and the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction!

Melding the entirely true and the wildly fictional, Dead End in Norvelt is a novel about an incredible two months for a kid named Jack Gantos, whose plans for vacation excitement are shot down when he is “grounded for life” by his feuding parents, and whose nose spews bad blood at every little shock he gets. But plenty of excitement (and shocks) are coming Jack’s way once his mom loans him out to help a fiesty old neighbor with a most unusual chore—typewriting obituaries filled with stories about the people who founded his utopian town. As one obituary leads to another, Jack is launched on a strange adventure involving molten wax, Eleanor Roosevelt, twisted promises, a homemade airplane, Girl Scout cookies, a man on a trike, a dancing plague, voices from the past, Hells Angels . . . and possibly murder.

Endlessly surprising, this sly, sharp-edged narrative is the author at his very best, making readers laugh out loud at the most unexpected things in a dead-funny depiction of growing up in a slightly off-kilter place where the past is present, the present is confusing, and the future is completely up in the air.

,Jack Gantos has written books for people of all ages, from picture books and middle-grade fiction to novels for young adults and adults. His works include Hole in My Life, a memoir that won the Michael L. Printz and Robert F. Sibert Honors; the Joey Pigza series, which include a Newbery Honor book and a National Book Award Finalist; Dead End in Norvelt, winner of the Newbery Medal and the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction; and the Rotten Ralph series.,

PRE-READING ACTIVITY
Ask students to brainstorm the kind of information normally featured in an obituary.
Read aloud the obituary of a house that Miss Volker writes for the Norvelt News
(pp. 194–97). Have students write an obituary of an old toy. Encourage them to
include personal information. They may also wish to make it humorous.
THEMATIC CONNECTIONS:
Questions for Group Discussion
FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS
• Describe Jack’s family.
• Jack is punished by his mom for shooting his dad’s rifle and for mowing down her
cornfield. Discuss how he is the victim in both incidents.
• Jack’s parents try to convince him that they work as a team. Debate whether
there is any teamwork in the Gantos family.
• Cite evidence that Jack’s mom “wears the pants in the family.”
• Which of Jack’s parents does he most respect?
FRIENDSHIP
• Ask students to discuss Jack’s reputation among his peers.
• Bunny Huffer is Jack’s best friend. Trace their relationship from the beginning
of the novel to the end.
• At first, Jack is simply Miss Volker’s scribe. At what point does he become
her friend?
• How does Bunny regard Jack’s relationship with Miss Volker?
• Ask students to discuss the relationship between Mr. Spizz and Miss Volker.
• Mr. Spizz enjoys pestering Jack. Debate whether he is jealous of Jack’s
relationship with Miss Volker.
COMMUNITY
• Norvelt is a New Deal community that was built to give “hardworking poor
people a helping hand” (p. 54). Why does Jack’s dad call it a “Commie” town?
• Discuss Miss Volker’s commitment to the town.
• Debate whether Norvelt has lost its true sense of community.
• What does Mrs. Gantos miss most about the “old” Norvelt? How is she trying to
instill a sense of community in Jack?
• Discuss how a town can change without changing its sense of community.
COURAGE
• Jack tells his mother that his dad made him mow down the corn. Why does he
feel that squealing on his dad was a cowardly thing to do?
• Anytime that Jack is anxious or fearful, his nose bleeds. How does it take courage
to let Miss Volker operate on his nose?
• Explain how Bunny contributes to Jack’s fears. How does she also help him gain
courage?
• What is Jack’s most courageous act in the novel?
LYING/HONESTY
• Explain what Mrs. Gantos means when she tells Jack, “Remember, a
person first lies to himself before he lies to others” (pp. 207–8).
• Jack tells his parents that he didn’t put the bullet in the rifle. Why does it take
Mr. Gantos a while to admit that Jack is telling the truth?
• Who are the most honest and trustworthy characters in the novel?
• Discuss the most dishonest characters. How do they lie to themselves and to the
entire community?
GROWING UP
• At different times in the novel, Bunny and Miss Volker tell Jack that he needs to
be a man. How might their definition of a man differ?
• In what ways is Jack’s father still a boy? Debate whether this interferes with
Jack’s journey toward manhood.
• At what point in the novel does Jack begin to understand his role as a man?
Which character is most responsible for his coming of age?
CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS
VOCABULARY
The vocabulary in the novel is not difficult, but students should be encouraged to
jot down unfamiliar words and try to define them using clues from the context.
Such words may include: sinister (p. 22), delusional (p. 27), abscond (p. 30), feral (p. 49),
contempt (p. 55), willful (p. 71), carnage (p. 90), barter (p. 95), convulsive (p. 128),
euthanized (p. 135), simian (p. 166), incredulous (p. 175), ingrate (p. 175), tirade (p. 202),
restorative (p. 263), impaled (p. 303), and noxious (p. 311).
LANGUAGE ARTS
Jack’s favorite part of the newspaper is the “This Day In History” column written
by Miss Volker. The paper reprints old columns that she wrote when her hands were
good. Ask each student to pick a date in July or August and research historical events
that happened on that day. Then have them write a new “This Day In History”
column that Jack might write for the Norvelt News.
For another assignment, ask students to think about the humor in both character
and plot in the novel. Then have them do a funny live radio interview with Miss
Volker and Jack about the day Miss Volker is held captive by Mr. Spizz, how she got
him to confess to the murders, and how he arranged his getaway. Ask other folks in
Norvelt to react to his crime.
SOCIAL STUDIES
There were many New Deal communities similar to Norvelt located throughout the
nation. Refer students to the following Web site for information about some of these
communities: http://www.arthurdaleheritage.org/history/new-deal-homestead-communities/.
Ask each student to write and illustrate a brief article on one New Deal community.
The illustration may include, among other things, a map or a drawing of the
architecture of the homes. Instruct students to make a statement about what has
happened to the community.
For another activity, arrange a classroom debate based on the ongoing argument
between Jack’s parents about the principles on which Norvelt was founded. For
instance, consider the scene where Jack and his parents play Monopoly on his birthday
(p. 185). His parents disagree about the value of the game. Mr. Gantos calls it “the
American dream in a box.” Mrs. Gantos counters: “It teaches you how to ruin other
people’s lives without caring.” Divide the class into two opposing teams. Have one
team adopt Mrs. Gantos’s view of Mrs. Roosevelt and the New Deal communities,
and the other Mr. Gantos’s attitude toward Norvelt and his role in dismantling the
town. Then hold a debate between the teams about the New Deal communities and
how the game of Monopoly relates to the concept of community.
SAFETY
Jack’s dad has a talk with him about gun safety. Divide the class into small groups and
ask them to make a two-minute video on gun safety. Encourage them to be creative
and to use a title or slogan that will get kids’ attention. Then have them become
familiar with the gun laws in their state.
DRAMA
Divide the class into four groups. Ask each group to pick a favorite chapter in the
novel, prepare a script from it, and present it as a one-act play in one of the following
genres: mystery, horror, comedy, or soap opera.
ART
Have students record everything they know about Mr. Spizz. Ask them to make a
”Wanted” poster for his arrest. Include a reward for his capture. Make a composite
sketch for the poster that Jack and Miss Volker offer to the authorities.
INTERNET RESOURCES
http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=33
This official Web site of the National First Ladies’ Library provides a biography of
Eleanor Roosevelt and discusses her contribution to her husband’s New Deal programs.
http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=6328
This official Web site of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force provides the
history and specifications of the Piper Cub J-3 plane like the one Mr. Gantos bought.

,

“Gantos captures the voice of a middle-school boy in a relatable way, with plenty of self-consciousness and humor, and he infuses the storyline with a sense of mystery, danger, and adventure…This is an engaging story that makes for compelling listening.” —Parents Choice Gold Award

“The audiobook was just for fun, since Jack narrated it himself and I’d listen to him read a grocery list, his delivery is that funny.” —Horn Book Magazine

“Gantos narrates this laugh-out-loud semi-autobiographical tale, providing a pitch-perfect rendition of Jack’s sarcasm, exaggeration, and whining.” —School Library Journal

“Listening to [Jack Gantos] – both his voice and the crazy tales he tells – reminds me a bit of David Sedaris. Fans of his work will likely enjoy this as well. The attitude is the same, too. He doesn’t judge, he just tells it as he sees it. The dialogue and the first person reflections make audio an ideal way to experience it.” —5 Minutes for Books

“Looking for a great audiobook for boys? This is it. Further blurring the line between fact and fiction in this autobiographical novel, author Jack Gantos narrates himself, sharing the 1962 summer adventures of his eponymous hero as he navigates adolescence and a dying town caught between two eras…The story is a little odd and a lot funny. Gantos’s delivery is dry and wry, and even when characters don’t get distinctive voices, the action and emotion are utterly clear. A gem.” —AudioFile Magazine

“It is hard to imagine anyone other than Jack Gantos reading Dead End in Norvelt. Like most of his books, this is slightly autobiographical (Gantos was born in Norvelt but did not grow up there). Listeners really hear the intended inflections and accents as well as the energy and emotion found in the story.” —Library Media Connection

“Dead End in Norvelt, this year’s Newberry winner for best young adult fiction, is even more hilarious in audio form as read by author Jack Gantos. My family howled out loud as we listened to it during a spring break drive to California.” —The Bellingham Herald

“This is a brilliant book, full of history, mystery, and laughs. It reminded me of my small-town childhood, although my small town was never as delightfully weird as Norvelt.” —Dave Barry

“A bit of autobiography works its way into all of Gantos’s work, but he one-ups himself in this wildly entertaining meld of truth and fiction by naming the main character . . . Jackie Gantos.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A fast-paced and witty read.” —School Library Journal

“A more quietly (but still absurdly) funny and insightful account of a kid’s growth, kin to Gantos’s Jack stories, that will stealthily hook even resistant readers into the lure of history.” — Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (BCCB)

“This winning novel, both humorous and heartwarming, takes place during the summer of 1962, when narrator Jack Gantos turns 12 and spends most of his days grounded. Jack’s main ‘get out of jail free card,’ and one of the novel’s most charming characters, is Miss Volker. The blossoming of their friendship coincides with the blooming of Jack’s character.” —Shelf Awareness Pro

“There’s more than laugh-out-loud gothic comedy here. This is a richly layered semi-autobiographical tale, an ode to a time and place, to history and the power of reading.” —The Horn Book, starred review

“Gantos, as always, delivers bushels of food for thought and plenty of outright guffaws.” —Booklist

“An exhilarating summer marked by death, gore and fire sparks deep thoughts in a small-town lad not uncoincidentally named ‘Jack Gantos.’ The gore is all Jack’s, which to his continuing embarrassment ‘would spray out of my nose holes like dragon flames’ whenever anything exciting or upsetting happens. And that would be on every other page, seemingly . . . Characteristically provocative gothic comedy, with sublime undertones.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Nobody can tell a story like Jack Gantos can. And this is a story like no other. It’s funny. It’s thoughtful. It’s history. It’s weird. But you don’t need me to attempt to describe it. Get in there and start reading Gantos.” —Jon Scieszka, founder of guysread.com and author of the Spaceheadz series

“The Newbury Medal-winning book has all the ingredients for a great audiobook – a strong narrative voice, a blend of humor and pathos, and a performer who has unique authority: it all happened to him, with some subtle fictionalizations.” —Book Links

Dead End in Norvelt was published on September 13, 2011.

The intended audience for this book is 10 to 14 years old. The Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook is 1193 hours and 20 minutes. Speechify has the Unabridged edition version of the audiobook.

Both the publication language and the narration language are in English.

Speechify, the World's Audiobook App

Stars.svg
20M+ downloads | 150K+ 5-stars reviews
Scan now to listen it on your phone!

Subjects in Dead End in Norvelt

Dead End in Norvelt includes the following subjects: Historical / United States / 20th Century. The BISAC Subject Code is Juvenile Fiction, Social Issues, New Experience.

About the Author(s) of Dead End in Norvelt

The author of Dead End in Norvelt is Jack Gantos.

About the Narrator of Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook

The narrator for the Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook is Jack Gantos.

Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook Additional Info

The imprint is Macmillan Young Listeners. It is supplied by MPS. The ISBN-10 is 1427213577. The ISBN-13 is 9781427213570.

Global Availability of Dead End in Norvelt Audiobook

VI, AS, PR, MP, PH, UM, CA, US, GU, AU, GD, ZM, CM, NA, NR, GB, FJ, PN, LC, SC, BB, IQ, MT, KW, WS, FK, MM, UG, TV, BS, BN, VU, DM, TO, IE, GM, JE, KY, NG, BZ, GI, MQ, MS, TT, TZ, TC, TK, SB, AG, BD, GY, KI, AI, IM, ZW, SO, SZ, BW, PG, BM, PK, CY, VC, GH, VG, IN, LK, SH, SL, CC, JM, MU, LS, KN, NF, GG, KE, MW, PS, FI, KM, LT, TJ, AD, TL, RE, CG, HT, CD, MK, TH, AR, DZ, DJ, MY, NE, FR, AF, AX, CV, FM, PA, MF, SX, CI, HK, KR, GS, MZ, RO, DE, GE, HN, QA, BA, ER, KG, BY, SK, TW, AZ, AE, SV, PY, TG, SS, TN, NU, AM, GW, PF, IR, YT, TM, EG, KH, CZ, MV, CW, UY, CL, SY, RU, BV, NC, AW, LR, NI, BH, JO, ML, GF, SR, GN, IS, EE, UA, EH, PL, BQ, PE, CR, ID, BR, CN, ES, CK, TF, NZ, RS, HU, GA, BI, LI, TR, CX, BL, BF, SI, TD, CF, AQ, LB, PM, SG, GT, IT, MC, AO, BE, HR, SA, MH, VN, CU, MO, KZ, BO, GP, UZ, MN, MG, LU, SD, KP, PT, JP, ET, VA, NO, SM, FO, IL, LA, CO, DK, AL, WF, LV, PW, MR, SJ, YE, HM, OM, BG, GQ, ME, BJ, ZA, EC, DO, BT, RW, GL, MA, SN, NL, MD, NP, ST, MX, IO, SE, VE, LY, GR, AT, CH

Related audiobooks

  • The Fort Gordon Korman What if you found a place that nobody else knew about? The morning after Hurricane Leo rips through their town, Evan, Jason, Mitchell, and C.J. find a total mess outside, with downed branches and uprooted trees everywhere. They know they should stay indoors—but they want to go exploring, even if it means having a new kid, Ricky, tag along. Ricky’s the first one to discover a strange trapdoor ... Read more about The Fort
  • The Cockroach Ian McEwan A brilliant, of-the-moment political satire like no other: here is Ian McEwan’s Brexit-era take on Kafka’s Metamorphosis, centered on a cockroach transformed into the prime minister of England. An Anchor Original. That morning, Jim Sams, clever but by no means profound, woke from uneasy dreams to find himself transformed into a giant creature. Jim Sams has undergone a metamorphosis. In his ... Read more about The Cockroach
  • Lady of Bones Carolyn Haines Carolyn Haines’s Lady of Bones is the next novel in the series that Kirkus Reviewscharacterizes as “Stephanie Plum meets the Ya-Ya Sisterhood” featuring sassy Southern private investigator Sarah Booth Delaney. It’s Halloween season in Mississippi as Sarah Booth and the gang gather to decorate and gush over Tinkie’s new baby, Maylin. Sarah Booth is just about to refresh the cocktails ... Read more about Lady of Bones
  • Mayo Clinic on Osteoporosis Ann E. Kearns “No matter your age or bone health, you can take steps to prevent future breaks. The best time to start is now.” Your skeleton is a busy system of living tissue. Every day, bone is being broken down and replaced. But with osteoporosis, this process causes your bones to become weak and fragile. The disease often goes undetected until you have a fall or a painful fracture. However, having ... Read more about Mayo Clinic on Osteoporosis
  • Dead Shot J.A. Johnstone Luke Jensen brings a body to Rio Rojo. After all, it’s his job, and he’s going to get paid. But before he can collect the bounty for killing a killer, two notorious criminals hit the Rio Rojo bank. Now Luke can’t get paid unless he catches professional bandit Gunner Kelly and his Apache sidekick Dog Eater. Unfortunately, a would-be man hunter is after the money-toting outlaws, too, and ... Read more about Dead Shot

Choose Language :