Writing Prompts vs writing challenge

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Writing Prompts

Category: Writing Tool

Industries: Business, Education

Pricing

In App Purchases

writing challenge

Category: Writing Tool

Industries: Education, Bussines, Journalist, Writers, Professionals

Pricing

Price

$1.99

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Most popular feedback for Writing Prompts

It's a really fun application that allows you to interact to with other writers by seeing and sharing your stories with one another. This is an incredible tool for those who tend to be more on the reclusive side or are just shy. For this reason I highly recommend this to anybody aspiring to be a writer.

Crystal White

About Writing Prompts

In a writing rut? Lacking inspiration for writing? Writing prompts will assist you in enhancing your writing. This software will expand your writing opportunities with its practical and creative writing prompts. Each writing exercise has been carefully chosen and written to encourage you to create in any genre. Ideas: As writers, we occasionally need some inspiration to get going. Ideas don't always arrive completely formed, but even just one line or a general notion can be quite helpful. With this software, we hope to provide it for you. Every creation requires a solid source of inspiration. And inspiration may help you create your best work. Get inspired by reading the prompts! Which one will become your own masterpiece is impossible to predict. Embrace your imagination; the words are inside you and will flow when the perfect thought occurs. Writing Prompts is brimming with different ideas and prompts. There is one there that possibly include the concept that your writing was trying to convey. Describe your prompts. Please feel free to contribute any prompts you may have that you believe may be useful to others. Let's develop as a neighborhood together! Create your own narratives. Give your tales to the world to hear. For the prompts, create and publish your own stories. Get opinions from authors all across the world. You are awaiting ideas and stories. No more apologies.

Most popular feedback for writing challenge

This January, I decided to write a poem a day for a month (à la NaPoWriMo) with a couple of friends. I thought of this as exercise—something I didn’t want to do but knew would be good for me. And like exercise, I wanted instant gratification and endorphins. Instead, I experienced daily writing as another way to approach myself, both the good and bad. Some thoughts from the month: Most days are unspectacular, but on the worst days, nothing is in my fingers. Or in my brain. I don’t like anything I’ve written, so I repeatedly type and backspace the way I tell my students not to do during in-class writing activities. I click through old poems nostalgically as if to harness the magic of a moment when something sprang forth out of nothing. I feel like I’ll never write something good again. It’s as if negative self-talk itself will produce the poem. On other days, a poem appears in my mind like a gift. Some lines come to me when I don’t expect it (which, in the moment, I see as magical rather than the result of practice). I sit down in Nordstrom Rack and type on my phone instead of finding new sneakers like I’d been planning to. By the time I get out, it’s dark and I’m late for dinner. In these moments, I feel most like a writer. But isn’t being a writer both of these extremes, and the more boring in-between? A lot of content is needed, so whatever is around me goes in a poem. I look outside my apartment window and see trees, and yes, birds. I understand more deeply why trees and birds are such favorite topics. My husband, a teacher, comes home to tell me a student asked what was wrong with his eyes. Wolf’s eyes, the second grader had said. This also goes in a poem, but I think the story of the student is better. For a few years, I’d written about what blue eyes meant to me, the desire for blue eyes, the way they pierced me as a child not used to them, and this student had described them in the shortest phrase. This, too, is a gift. I worry the most when I wake up in the middle of the night, and, to avoid anxiety—about the class I teach, what I said or didn’t say to someone I wanted to impress, that I worry about impressing at all—I think of poems and start writing in my head. My brain gets busy. This is the opposite of counting sheep or deep breaths. On one hand, the poem is a repository for anxious thoughts, and on the other, a diversion from them. My therapist asks if I’ve ever wanted to speak up but felt I couldn’t—not that I chose not to for my own reasons. My answer is a hard yes. She says it’s good that I have an outlet in writing. I haven’t thought of poetry as an outlet for years and linger over the phrasing. Later, I realize it’s because I’ve associated outlets with the outpouring of emotion—something that must be let out, that must leave the body in whatever way possible—and therefore a contradiction to craft. The careful making of something, the work of a poet. But the more I think about it, the more I don’t think outlet and craft have to conflict. The poem is, in one sense, how I retroactively speak up for the times I couldn’t, like at the oral surgeon’s office experiencing microaggressions. It’s the Yelp review I’d always planned to write. When the month is over, I’m spent. I celebrate with boba from the newly-opened Kung Fu Tea a mile away. I haven’t taken stock of the revision ahead of me yet, the inevitable cutting and throwing away—that I can’t just throw my poems up into the air and watch them fall into place, a manuscript. Right now, the sugar and treating myself are enough like endorphins.

Lisa Low

About writing challenge

With Writing Challenge, you will brainstorm new and fresh ideas and embrace freewriting in the funniest way ever. Get new prompts to start writing your story with just a touch on your screen.

Writing Prompts reviews

Don't get me wrong, I love app! I really enjoy how if you like someone's prompt you can favorite it and like it and follow them. It even has many different genres you can look up for specific prompts. Edit (I have re-gotten the app and loving it even more! There are more prompts and feeds and my prompts showed up. The ones I submitted were a while back, so I need to make new. But if your looking for a fun way to share your creativity and skills than this is the app for you, it just takes time! )

- Felicity starnes

Good stories and prompts. The community seems pretty small and not very active, because most of the prompts I see don't have any stories written for them. One major problem I have with the app is that if too many genres are added initially, I can't press the submit button because the genres list pushes it down and there's no scrolling on the screen. Aside from that, it would be nice if there were more genres, and maybe a "prompt filler's choice" genre option or something.

- A Google user

The app is simply... decent. Honestly, if it weren't for the user submitted prompts, it would be far better, even four or five stars. I spent a while scrolling through the user-submitted prompts, and they were unimaginative at best, and rife with grammar and spelling errors to the point of being unintelligible at worst.

- A Google user

writing challenge reviews

Pretty good, just keep adding content. Really good app, but maybe it would be better if you made each step semi-relate to one another, so you don't have a COMPLETELY random story. But other then that, just keep updating with new content, and it'll be .

- LoyalWOLFpAcK

Not able to use it as a slide over with iOS 11 on ipad This app would be wonderful if it could be a small part of the screen while you write on Word, Note, or whatever. Instead it has two settings, on and off. It will not split a screen or work in slide over. Instead of being able to keep one eye on it while I write, I need to check back to it or use two devices. Am I missing something?

- Solitaire123xyz

Upgrade I think it should save where we left off in our steps. I mean I was going! And then BAM!!! I gotta do something. Turned off my phone and when I came back, my steps were gone.

- Tete_xoxo

Pros & cons

Writing Prompts

Pros
Clean design
Varied and interesting topics
Lots of content
Cons
Some prompts are generic
Sloppy notification system
No comments to prompts

writing challenge

Pros
I think this app is awesome!
It gives you ideas during writers block and helps to change the topic of your writing every so often
I think it's a essential writing tool and very necessary for writers.
Cons
Waste of money..
Can't write ON the app
WHEN THE PHONE LOCKS OR INACTIVE ALL THE PROGRESS IS DELETED.

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